TRP│Part 4 Gender Roles in Pride and Prejudice
Gender roles in Pride and Prejudice

TRP│Part 4 Gender Roles in Pride and Prejudice

TRP│Part 4 Gender Roles in Pride and Prejudice 1

Pride & Prejudice

A literary analysis of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice on the gender roles in Regency England.

Part 4

 

Conclusion after analysing the gender roles in Pride and Prejudice

After finishing this paper, I established that Pride and Prejudice gives you a very clear image of the gender roles in Regency England. Jane Austen describes so many subjects that are related to the gender roles of her time, that there were simply too many quotes in this book to discuss in one single paper. Therefore, I only examined the first few chapters because otherwise, this paper would have been way too long for a paper.

It was very interesting to use Pride and Prejudice for this study, as this book is written by a lady who actually lived in this period. I’ve read Pride and Prejudice, of course, and it wasn’t until I began analysing it that I fully understood the whole story. When I started looking into the separate spheres, the accomplishments, the inheritance laws, the strict etiquette at balls and marriage, the story became that much more interesting. I also noticed that Jane Austen used her own experiences as inspiration for Pride and Prejudice, which makes it an excellent source for studies like this. However, even though she mentioned a lot about the gender roles of her time, further research was necessary to fully understand these subjects. So, coming back to my research question: I do think that Pride and Prejudice is a very good resource for studies like this, as it gives you an idea of what daily life was like as someone in Regency England. However, you do need some background information to completely understand the multiple aspects of Regency England’s gender roles as they were back then.

Writing this paper has been quite a journey. At the start, I didn’t work efficiently at all. First, I wanted to analyse multiple books in chronological order to see if we can establish a development in how women are portrayed in literature over time. This turned out to take too much time, definitely more than 80 hours. I decided to focus on one book: Pride and Prejudice. I was about to analyse all the sentences in her novel that were related to the gender roles of Regency England, but this was very inefficient as this book has got 61 chapters. However, these little, inefficient ‘mistakes’ weren’t a waste of time. I learned a lot from them, and I think the experience of writing this literary analysis has not only taught me a lot about the gender roles in Regency England, but also taught me how to use my time more efficiently in the future at university, for example.

 

Reference list

Pride and prejudice, by Jane Austen. Publication date: 28 January 1813.

2 , 5The Anonymous Jane Austen, by Kate O’Connor at http://writersinspire.org/content/anonymous-jane-austen. Accessed on Thursday, 12 December 2019

3Why Jane Austen Never Married, by Erin Blakemore at https://www.history.com/news/why-jane-austen-never-married. Accessed on Thursday, 12 December 2019

4Jane Austen (1775 – 1817), by BBC UK at http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/austen_jane.shtml. Accessed on Thursday, 12 December 2019

6Mrs. Cawley and Jane Austen, by Brasenose College University of Oxford at https://www.bnc.ox.ac.uk/about-brasenose/history/216-brasenose-people/411-mrs-cawley-and-jane-austen. Accessed on Friday, 13 December 2019

7Jane Austen and The Oxford Connection, by Anna at https://austenised.blogspot.com/2010/11/jane-austen-and-oxford-connection.html. Accessed on Friday, 13 December 2019

8Jane Austen: her life, by Park Honan (biography, 1987). Accessed on Thursday, December 19, 2019

9The Novel Jane Austen Wrote When She Was Twelve, by Claudia L. Johnson at https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2018/09/14/the-novel-jane-austen-wrote-when-she-was-twelve/. Accessed on Thursday, 19 December 2019

10Jane Austen at Home: A Biography by Lucy Worsley (biography, 2017). Accessed on Thursday, 19 December 2019

11Eliza de Feuillide: Jane Austen’s ‘Outlandish Cousin’ by Rachel Kingston at https://www.janeausten.co.uk/eliza-de-feuillide-jane-austens-outlandish-cousin/. Accessed on Thursday, 19 December 2019

12Jane Austen, 41 (1775-1817) UK author, documentary by Lucy Worsley at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ER1EHvOYHJ8. Accessed on Thursday, 19 December 2019

13Marriage Proposal from Harris Bigg-Wither, at https://www.digitalausten.org/node/26. Accessed on Thursday, 19 December 2019

14Jane and the man of the cloth, by Stephanie Barron. Accessed on Thursday, 19 December 2019

15The Reverend George and Mrs. Austen: A closer look at Jane Austen’s Parents, at https://www.janeausten.co.uk/the-reverend-george-and-mrs-austen-a-closer-look-at-jane-austens-parents/. Accessed on Thursday, 19 December 2019

16October in Regency Bath, at https://www.janeausten.co.uk/october-in-regency-bath/#more-234. Accessed on Thursday, 19 December 2019

17See Jane Austen’s original will, at https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/see-jane-austens-original-will/. Accessed on Thursday, 19 December 2019

18Pride and Prejudice Economics: Or Why a Single Man with a Fortune of £4,000 Per Year is a Desirable Husband, by Vic at https://janeaustensworld.wordpress.com/2008/02/10/the-economics-of-pride-and-prejudice-or-why-a-single-man-with-a-fortune-of-4000-per-year-is-a-desirable-husband/. Accessed on Monday, 30 December 2019

19Morning Calls and Formal Visits: Socializing in the Regency Era, by Maria Grace at https://englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.com/2013/08/morning-calls-and-formal-visits.html. Accessed on Tuesday, 07 January 2020

20The Significance of Balls in Pride and Prejudice, by Sophia Argiroudis at  https://remediatingromanticismsummer2016.wordpress.com/2016/06/06/the-significance-of-balls-in-pride-and-prejudice/. Accessed on Tuesday, 07 January 2020

21The 10 do’s and don’ts of etiquette to become a lady in Regency England, by D.G. Hewitt at https://historycollection.co/the-10-dos-and-donts-of-etiquette-to-become-a-lady-in-regency-england/. Accessed on Tuesday, 07 January 2020

22The ball in the novels of Jane Austen, by John Mullan at https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/articles/the-ball-in-the-novels-of-jane-austen. Accessed on Tuesday, 07 January 2020

23Fordyce’s Sermons and Jane Austen’s, by Jane Lark at https://thebeaumonde.com/fordyces-sermons-and-jane-austens-joke-by-jane-lark/ . Accessed on Tuesday, 07 January 2020 

24Pride and Prejudice and the Napoleonic Wars, at https://www.sparknotes.com/lit/pride/context/historical/pride-and-prejudice-and-the-napoleonic-wars/. Accessed on Wednesday, 05 February 2020

 

 

TRP│Part 4 Gender Roles in Pride and Prejudice 1

Thanks for reading

Okay, this is not my normal type of blog, but I made this paper for school (at the end of high school) and I thought it was interesting to share 🙂

If you want to read more of my blogs, visit my page here on luvioni.com.

 

Thereadingproject

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